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calling for action to protect the environment. >> announcer: major funding for "religion and ethics news weekly" is provided by the lillian endowment dedicated to its founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also proved by mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products, that's why we're you're retirement company. >>> and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> . >>> welcome, i'm bob apper nathy. it's good to have you with us. in the wake of this week's series of events in boston, people of faith around the world have been offering prayers for victims of the bombing and for the entire city. president obama spoke at an interfaith service thursday boston's cathedral of the holy cross. >> you've shown us, boston. that in the face of evil, americans will lift up what's good. in the face of cruelty, we will choose compassion. >> we have more on religious responses in boston. ♪ ♪ >> at thursday's interfaith service, local religious leaders prayed for the healing of their city in the wake of the attks. >> w
is at work. everybody is on this. in that kind of an environment with a large city like this, large police department, obviously the first responders on the scene are race volunteers, runners themselves, passersby. and emts. how does it work practically to have the foeb in charge? the n fbi is coordinating it. what does that mean when they're dealing with a large sort of resources. >> first of all, new in being a real attack is not new to the city of boston, the state of massachusetts and the federal authorities up there. back in 2011, just over two years ago, and previously before that the federal government in conjunction with boston did exercises exactly to prepare for situations like this. so what you have is the immediate response is always going to be governed by the boston police department and fire department. and then over team there will be a transition to the fbi. but most importantly, this has to be done hand in hand. the state, local and federal cooperation, this isn't honestly like the movies, where the fbi shows up and says we're in charge now. the relationship between the f
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
answer. you can reduce the risk of an incident but you cannot create a fail/safe environment. certainly not along a 26-mile plus path that goes through commercial, residential areas. it is difficult enough at an ampitheater, race track, gymnasium, or stadium. i think we'll see in the future perhaps additional security but there are certain venues that it is very, very difficult to maximize to a point where you're fairly competent that nothing can happen and certainly a marathon is one of those kinds of events. as you and i both know every day in this country there are multiple venues where hundreds if not thousands if not tens of thousands of people for social, political, athletic reasons show up. so there will be lessons learned based on this tragedy. there will be probably a little more inconvenience down the road about -- i read with great interest that the london marathon is going on. pittsburgh is having a marathon next week. they have not canceled that. they're encouraging the runners to go. there was an interesting piece by tom friedman today in the "new york times." he basically
. in an odds, ironic way, you couldn't have had a better environment for a criminal investigation than yesterday. i mean, you had so much security on site, including the national guard, the joint terrorism tank force is on high alert for big events like this. i think they're going to crack this case pretty fast. >> you feel very comfortable that very soon we should have some information on who was behind this attack? >> i do. because it looks like an amateur job for one from what we know. >> it does? >> the early analysis of the bombs. these are not plastique explosives favored by professional terrorist groups you might say. also, you know, many of the things that civil libertarians complain about, the intrusive surveillance and monitoring of e-mail and phone traffic and so on, these are all in place. these are going to work much to the government's advantage in this particular incident. >> so very soon some information should be coming out. >> we don't like to same, you know -- but if ever the government was positioned to solve the case quickly, it's in boston where all the security a
and it's particularly challenging in this fiscal environment. the administration's $39 billion budget deficit request makes some very tough choices. it cuts the department's budget by roughly 2%, below 2012 levels. but it's the least consistent with what the congress appropriated in 2013 for the epartment. stepping back and thinking of all the challenges that our country and this department have faced since 2009, christmas day bomber, time square bomber, yemen cargo bomb plot, hurricane sandy and the ever-changing and ever-growing cyberthreat, and now the boston attack, it's easy to become concerned with this budget request. that said, we're facing extremely difficult budgetary times and sacrifices must be made. and while i recognize important missions may not receive all of the funds they or we would want in a perfect world, all departments and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required to iranian in our deficit -- rein in our deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. identifying some $1.3 billion in cost savings this year and m
our green is universal with green beer. we mean beer production that goes easy on the environment. it's an interesting story and iex breaking right here squawk this morning. miller coor's is reporting that its famous golden colorado brewery, the largest single site brewery on the planet is now weeks away from becoming a zero waste site. what does that moon exactly? more than 99% of brewery waste, glass, plastic, even spent grain gets reused or recycled. interesting story behind this initiative, the idea came from a long time employee, a shop floor technician there with the initial plan to get the company's major breweries to zero waste. for much more on earth week and this story and others, check out green.cnbc.com. kind of an interesting feel good -- and it has to do with beer and drinking. >> i didn't know this. jane wells and tom rotuna on the on assignment desk are doing this whole thing called brew and chew. >> i read about this, too. it's going the be online. >> on cnbc.com. it's all about beer news, food news. jane wells, i saw her in california two weeks ago. she said she prom
for a few hours, and to institute a special targeting roles, both in the air environment and at the canadian import environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. again,spect to fema, when you saw the response in boston and how coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november boston held a mass of exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event, and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercises courted by the committee to fhrough fema, crease in our ability for response and resilience. we provided several intel products and briefings to law enforcement across the country, critical conner and operators, and we have been reaching out to community organizations who want to know what they can do. we are and lamenting security measures, both seen and unseen, at airports, transit hubs with in the maritime and run it, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is providing security on the ferries in the doing area, and teams are searches on terms of ground transportation and fell like. and finally, with respect to
something, say something. be aware of your environment. >> sounds like the best advice is don't let them affect your life, live your life? >> live your life. when you compromise how you live, that gives them a victory. as painful as it is today, you can't let them succeed, but us changing the norm, changing how we live. >> david kerley, abc news, washington. >> and a riveting picture from this day when we come back. i'm on expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
tricks of the trade, right up that gorgeous sleeve of hers. alaska is a very extreme environment. >> 30 foot seas, hurricane force winds. we go in and it's really bad situations, and we always pull it off. >> we hit the water. game on. go. go. get it on. >> under water, go. >> the rope why we all do this job is to save lives. >> a lot of the times the coast guard comes before family. >> when he's out flying, i do pray. >> everything i throw at it, we do. fall is final here. and for every season there's a reason to watch "wake up with al" on the weather channel. the front is going to move through and it's going to change the temperature. >> you just can't beat this kind of weather. >> everything you need to know, first thing. >> here's the big picture. >> we're kind of like a killer app in the morning. >> wake up with us. 78 hoo-hoo. hoo-hoo...hoo-hoo. o-hoo hoo. sir... i'll get it together i promise... heeheehee. jimmy: ronny, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? ronny:i'd say happier than the pillsbury doughboy on his way to a baking convention. get happ
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
money printing. in those environments, gold does very well. you have the goldman sachs downgrade. you have people picking sides. then you have the slowing chinese debt. i think that really hits the market all at once. that led to margins being that and they continue to tumble downwards. dagen: talk about the difference you are seeing in behavior. are you seeing any selling among those physical gold owners? >> not as dramatic of a difference. we are a precious metals platform. on friday and monday, we had four to five times as many body and sell orders. we have done our own research. i think that plays into my point. it is somewhat reminiscent to what happened to apple. in the paper market, you have a dramatic selloff. in the physical market, the demand is very, very strong. connell: let's follow up on that. let's talk about apple. the big game for the dollar versus the euro. is that part of the case you make for gold? >> i think part of the reason is for safety. in times like this, i think now is a fantastic entry point. it is certainly better than two weeks ago. it is uncorrelated. t
, right? the world trade center attacks. this area knows this environment, this modern terrorist really well.l. what is -- modern terrorism ter really well. what is going on in the markets transcend what's is going on globally for a couple of reasons. we've had this unprecedentedcede move to the outside. uncharted territory for the major averages. that has to cool off, right. china growth slowing and gold rocketing so much so soon for so long that things are starting to taper off a little bit. b that's what we saw yesterdayrday before the bombings which did intensify the fear out there. >> lauren thanks as always. see you tomorrow.tomo >> all right.>> a >> thank you very much. a powerful earthquake has hit h iran today. wisdom martin is back with more on the top stories makingng headlines this morning. good morning, wisdom.dom. >> good morning, tony. this say really bad situation. officials in iran say the number of dead could run into the hundreds. the earthquake struck near iran's border with pakistan andd so far at least 40 people aree dead. the 7.8 quake is the strongesttr to hit th
eliminate the other factors present in the environment. in fact, we wouldn't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing, the fbi initiated a command post. those assigned to the jttf intelligence analysts and other personnel from every state, local and federal government agency associated with jttf, and many others on their own's including boston pd and mass state police, more than a thousand law enforcement officers across many agencies have been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began to canvass sources and conduct interviews with others to determine who was responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically and carefully. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already, the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of noon today, many of which have already been reviewed, analyzed and vetted. we will continue to work around the clock tirelessly si
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
of the environment filtering down with the rain. last thing i heard about the fire at the fertilizer plant. it was smoldering. they felt more comfortable as time goes on and are feeling better about the fire there. there were still several fires from homes that were destroyed. those fires are smoldering as well. i can tell you there is nothing out of control there at this point. there's no fire out of control. there's no chemical escape from the fertilizer plant that's out of control. they are working to contain everything that they have in that area and are doing a fantastic job in very harsh circumstances in a very rough terrain as you can imagine. i've had several requests from many of you about trying to get into the area. i will tell you i don't know when or if that is going to happen. i will tell you that the folks that are on the ground securing that neighborhood have said there are unidentified people in the neighborhoods. there has been a small amount of looting to my understanding. we are securing that neighborhood as best we can meaning that everybody that is in there will eithe
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. , so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bondy, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the hairson family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious conc
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st century. much on thee very u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. the second reason this will be terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our great experts. ted. , weseries of speakers today will have first ambassador med
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
environment where anchors are filling, but you are right -- >> but they are really not that fast breaking. they are in the moment, but we don't have a lot of information. if you think about it if they had only reported what news they had, it would have had about three minutes of information, and then they could have said come back later, we'll tell you what else we got. but instead there was a bombing, we have surveillance video, the cops are doing xyandz and now we're going to talk about what people think could happen or what type of bombing should be. >> stephanie: yeah, is anybody saying the texas thing -- >> nobody is saying that yet. they are saying it was probably an accident. >> there's video now. i mean if you think about -- the reason the fertilizer plant thing is such a big deal if you think about how much fertilizer mcveigh used it was inside of a truck, and the damage it caused. you are talking about an entire plant of fertilizer and if you look at the one video i have seen of the explosion, it was ginormous. >> five blocks surrounding the plant have been c
. their concern is autonomy. there are actors within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american sentiments. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase community between -- communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization.
environment. thank you, mr. speaker. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> i rise today to talk about the recent passing of dick falla, a great friend to working men and women of illinois and iowa, and a great ally to american workers. dick spent his life fighting to improve the lives of others. he was a tireless and passionate advocate for working families and true champion for civil rights. st's a lifel heght for local d national leader on half of the american worker he showed up at every labor rally, pickett line, and civil rights event. rain, snow, heat, old age, and sickness. nothing could deter dick from fighting on he behalf of working people. he was a rousing public speaker and inspired generations of illinoisans and iowans to get involved in public service. i know my husband, jerry, and i extend our condolences to dick's family. he will truly be missed. thank you, mr. speaker an
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
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